Thoughts on engagement pods?

I’m curious to hear everyone’s thoughts on engagement pods, or amplifation groups (I’ve heard it called a few different things).
Basically, where you belong to a group a people, either a mastermind group or a networking group and if you have a post that you want to get good reach, you ask everyone in your group to go and like that post, share it, etc.

I have a client that is in one of these groups, but something about it doesn’t feel right.

On the one hand, does it not put the content into the wrong audience? The people in the group aren’t the target audience, so by them engaging with it, does it not mess up the algorithm and put it in front of the wrong people?

On the other hand, having people engage with a post is good for results…

Not sure about this one - would love everyone’s thoughts!

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I have no statistical data behind this that I can remember, so it’s my opinion. I think the idea of engagement pods came about potentially from the idea that if your post gets engagement early, it’s more likely to reach wider audiences.

So something like FB, I had previously heard it doesn’t blast your post to everyone that follows you, only a random set of 50 people on your list. So if people engage with the post, it’ll share it to more people. Potentially other sites do this as well, so people are just trying to play the algorithm.

Personally I’m not a fan, and I don’t think they hack the algorithm as much as they used to do. The engagement pod should be in the same niche otherwise it doesn’t make sense. So it wouldn’t put the content in front of the wrong audience because they’re all in that similar reach.

If 100k people follow me and I share something on linkedin, it shows up on their feeds. So it would be reaching the right audience if both people are in the same niche.

So that has potential. Another thing with engagement pods is that maybe it makes people feel fake good. We love the hit of a post getting shared or liked or commented on. It’s the psychology of social media, and that’s definitely been documented.

Also you become dependent on this engagement pod and whatever weird rules and cliques they got.

We also have to remember that just because we want to support someone a lot and we like and share their posts etc constantly doesn’t mean we’re in an engagement pod :smiley:

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I’ve been a member of several of these pod groups and they inevitably disintegrate after a short amount of time. They’re less effective because the behavior is consistent and detectable - even if it’s human-led, it LOOKS automated because the same cluster of people are performing the same actions, often in a very short time frame.

The better strategy is to build a community somewhere (NOT on a major social network) and let sharing and engagement flow from that more naturally.

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As others have said: it used to do more than it does now, and it gives kind of a false sense of engagement because it’s not a new or necessarily relevant audience that you’re getting that engagement from—it’s people who are semi-obligated to engage. And, as others have said, the platforms kind of notice that now, so they no longer give you that extra reach boost from early engagement that once they may have. Overall, I’d stick to just building that audience genuinely—though if you want to start actively doing CTAs for people to “click the bell” on various platforms (not always a bell, LOL) and get notified when you post stuff, it should provide a similar effect in a way that’s more genuine and is targeted at an enthusiastic, real audience. :heart:

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Thank you so much - those were my thoughts, but wanted to make sure I wasn’t missing something!

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